Classes start in five days

What I’m Taking: 18.022, 8.01, 3.091, 21L.001, and 6.0001.

Non-MIT people are probably raising an eyebrow or mouthing “what the fuck?”

So MIT likes numbers, and it’s much easier to tell other classmates about their classes using building numbers or course numbers instead of actual descriptive words. Here is a cheat sheet for all the courses (MIT calls majors courses for some reason) that are available:

  1. Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Mechanical Engineering
  3. Material Science and Engineering
  4. Architecture
  5. Chemistry
  6. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  7. Biology
  8. Physics
  9. Brain and Cognitive Sciences
  10. Chemical Engineering
  11. Urban Studies and Planning
  12. Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
  13. [redacted]
  14. Economics
  15. Business and Management
  16. Aeronautics and Astronautics (AeroAstro)
  17. Political Science
  18. Mathematics
  19. [redacted]
  20. Biological Engineering
  21. Humanities and Arts (there are a lot of subcategories here)
  22. Nuclear Science and Engineering
  23. [redacted]
  24. Linguistics and Philosophy

There are other courses that aren’t numbers like WGS or CMS but you get the general gist of it. So when I say 18.022, I mean that I’m taking a class from the department of mathematics. Usually, the first digit indicates the general level of a course, so 18.0x(x) usually indicates a basic sequence or an introductory level course in that department. And indeed, 18.02x is multivariable calculus, a class everyone at MIT must pass to graduate.

What’s the extra 2 at the end? It’s just a little harder and more theoretical. Will I drop from 18.022 to 18.02 in a few weeks after I realize that I’m boned? Probably.

8.01 is introductory mechanical physics, 3.091 is introductory solid-state chemistry, 21L.001 is about poetry, and 6.0001 (an unusual course number usually pronounced six-triple-oh-one or 6-thousand-one) is intro to programming using Python. I think numbers are a lot faster than actually having to write all these words out. Oh well.

Where I Live

Fifth West, East Campus.

I literally just moved in permanently so I’m kind of in the middle of a huge mess right now where my bed is not even close to being fully made and my furniture and suitcases are in diagonal messes on the floor. Starting tomorrow I’m going to clean things up and really start to take some ownership of my single room. I have a door to paint, walls to decorate, and a huge whiteboard to hang up.

As for Fifth West, the hall seems pretty chill. So what happened in the past week was something called REX aka “Residence Exploration” aka “dorm rush.” I got temped (temporarily placed to live) in East Campus’ Third West (aka Floorpi) during REX and decided to stay on East Campus. However, if you don’t like your dorm and would like to try and lottery out for a new one, you may do so with FYRE, which I think stands for Freshman Year Residence Exchange but I’m not entirely too sure. After REX is over, there is “hall rush” for some dorms, especially East Campus where there are so many unique personalities and cultures for all ten halls/floors. Although I didn’t get my top choice hall, I don’t see anything wrong with Fifth West and I’m more than happy to give it a chance.

What I’ve Done

These are blog posts that merit their own, but let’s just say that I did a lot of stuff. And another thing: I am now an MIT Admissions blogger, which is extremely cool and gratifying to say the least. (Well I guess I’m not one yet since I haven’t even written a single post, but I will soon!) My point is that when it comes to MIT-related stuff, I’m going to try and write in a lot more narrative style and post new updates on the MIT Admissions website at mitadmissions.org, and not here. But I’ll probably mirror posts that I make there and post it again here for continuity.

So it’s very very late at night and I would like to get some sleep, so I will stop for now. Until next time…